What Do Bed Bug Eggs Look Like?

Bed bugs are flat, oval-shaped insects that can be as small as 1/4 inch in length, about the size of an apple seed. They drink your blood and cause absolute havoc if you’ve got an infestation. You don’t know where to sleep, you’re afraid you’ll give your friends bed bugs by visiting them.

You can’t just destroy the adult bed bugs, you have to get rid of the eggs!

But what do bed bugs egg look like?

Bed bug eggs look something like a grain of salt or sugar. They are not microscopic but are super hard to see with the naked eye.

Here are some facts about bed bug eggs:

  • Bed bug eggs are only 1 millimeter long, approximately the size of a pinhead.
  • Female bed bugs lay eggs in batches of up to five eggs per day and up to 500 in a lifetime. 
  • Bed bug eggs hatch in about one week, and the newly hatched nymphs immediately begin to feed on nearby blood sources.

Eggs are usually an early indicator of an infestation. Bed bug eggs are the youngest form of a bed bug life cycle. It is important to know how to identify bed bug eggs to eliminate them before they become adult vampire bed bugs! 


What Do Bed Bug Eggs Look Like?

Bed Bug Eggs

Bed bugs produce eggs that could be compared to grains of rice, but the size of a grain of salt. Some compare them to milky-white poppy seeds.

The elongated eggs form visible dark spots after five days. The nymphs are white when they first hatch but turn brown after about a week. 

Bed bug eggs are oval-shaped and about 1/32 inch long with a protective shell that is clear or milky white/yellow in color. They also have a range of different shapes and sizes. Bed bugs lay eggs in batches of up to 20 eggs at a time. These eggs can hatch weeks later, and the bed bug population can quickly grow. 

Unfortunately, some people get confused between bed bug feces and eggs.

The feces of bed bugs resemble soft tar particles and are often found as little stains on bed sheets. In contrast, the eggs look like tiny rice grains or two grains of salt glued together. The eggs of bed bugs are usually found in cracks and crevices, behind wallpaper, under carpeting, or on bedding and mattresses.


Where Are Bed Bug Eggs Found?

Generally, bed bug infestations occur around or near people’s sleep areas. They like to attack exposed skin while people are sleeping. Infestation areas include apartments, hotels, shelters, rooming houses, and even schools

The female bed bugs lay eggs in out-of-the-way places such as seams of mattresses, cracks in furniture, along baseboards, within clutter, or objects on the floor. They find little cracks in plaster walls or floorboards to hide their brood.


Life Cycle of Bed Bugs

The bed bug life cycle is a process that includes three major stages: egg, nymph, and adult. Eggs are the first stage of the bed bug life cycle.

The adult female bed bug lays eggs in an environment that provides sufficient food for her offspring. 

The bed bug life cycle is a process that includes three major stages.

Eggs hatch into nymphs in about five days at room temperature. Nymphs are the second stage of the bed bug life cycle. They are small bed bugs that feed on blood from humans or other animals, such as pets or livestock. Nymphs are not adults yet, so they cannot reproduce. However, their bites can cause an allergic reaction in some people, just like mature bug bites do. 

They hatch from eggs and go through five molts before becoming adults. The nymphs are small and can only survive on blood meals when they’re young as they haven’t developed a way to digest food. 

The third stage of the life cycle is adulthood.

Adult bed bugs live for six months to one year. After that, they have fully developed reproductive organs and can start reproducing after they reach this stage in their development process.


Does Temperature Affect Bed Bugs and Their Eggs?

Temperature is one of the most crucial factors in the survival of bed bug eggs. The higher the temperature, the faster the eggs will hatch, but it shouldn’t exceed 100°F. 

According to entomologist Dini M. Miller, bed bugs can reach 100% mortality within 20 minutes if exposed to temperatures of 118°F.

However, if the temperature reaches 122°F (50°C), it will kill the laid eggs. 


How to Kill Bed Bug Eggs

There are various ways to kill bed bug eggs. One way is to use a vacuum cleaner to suck them up and dispose of them in a sealed bag or container.

Make sure you use a hose attachment while vacuuming with a brush. It will help vacuum up all the eggs visible on surfaces or in cracks and crevices. 

Another way is to use a steamer or heat treatment machine (known as thermal remediation) to kill eggs and bed bugs simultaneously.

However, if you’re going to rent a steamer, tell the people at the rental place you’re using it on bed bugs. They will make sure it gets hot enough to kill bed bugs, and they should also disinfect it after you’re done. It’s possible to spread bed bugs through steam cleaners, so be careful!

If you’re going to rent a steamer, tell the people at the rental place you’re using it on bed bugs. They will make sure it gets hot enough to kill bed bugs, and they should also disinfect it after you’re done. It’s possible to spread bed bugs through steam cleaners, so be careful!

Some people use a heat method to kill bed bug eggs, but this method is not always successful because eggs hatch at different times depending on their location in the house.

There are also concerns about using heat as you may damage your home interior or surroundings. 

Use a spray bottle with water and dish soap or bleach to kill the eggs (but be careful spraying bleach around!). Spray all the areas where you have seen bed bug eggs or signs such as fecal matter or blood spots. 

You may also use insecticides like Borax powder or diatomaceous earth to kill the bugs. Borax is a mineral mined from the earth and can be used as a household cleaner, laundry booster, and insecticide. 

Diatomaceous earth is made up of fossilized remains of tiny sea creatures called diatoms. It has sharp edges that cut into the exoskeleton of insects like bed bugs, so they die from dehydration when they come in contact with it.

Also, frequently wash all linens in hot water and dry on high heat for at least 20 minutes to get rid of the sticky eggs.


Conclusion

You’ve now got a good sense of what bed bug eggs look like, and where they might be hidden. They’re really hard to find, so be prepared for a slog. If you’ve got a bed bug problem, your best bet is to simply contact a professional.

Bed bugs are really difficult to get rid of, you’ll probably need some help. Good luck.